the old tale of the preacher

Word around the campfire is that a bunch of churchmen are being fingered as cheaters, outed in a “run-around-on-your-SO-site” hacking scandal. So what?

So they’re hypocrites? They don’t follow their own strictures, the ones they preach to everyone else? What of it? It’s the old tale of the preacher. I imagine it dates back to not long after the first proto-priest snuck off with the first proto-deacon’s hot hunter-gatherer lady, and all the best cuts of meat, while everyone else was, uh, hunting and gathering. Nothing new here.

The rotten thing they do is stand up and claim they have messages and instructions from gods. As soon as one says, “here’s a message from god” they’re pushing bullshit. As soon as they say “God commands all of us to…” they’re using that bullshit to manipulate others.

If they head directly to a motel hookup after the Sunday service it’s between them and their SO, their families, the people really affected by this. It’s not even the business of the “wounded” congregations, which will be fine in any case. Hell, they eat this stuff up. The sacred soap opera of scandal and repentance is fuel for moralistic faith. I predict donations and attendance (voluntary and otherwise) will be up at many if not most places with “fallen” pastors.

The apologies of faith leaders could be directed to the groups they regularly condemn,, and to the larger communities they demand kiss up to their mythologies. Where they work to censor art and science and education, where they instill guilt and prey on human fears and desires, where they troll children and vulnerable populations, that’s where they do damage. That’s where they could apologize for the bullshit, and slink away. They won’t though.

Their family dramas might make delicious reading (though usually these things are dull and sad), I don’t care for them though. I’m not a moral authority, it’s one of the few things I have in common with faith leaders.

If one wanted to establish a “Christian nation” or a nation built on the worship of any mythology and that mythology’s deities for that matter, a good place to mention it would be in the constitution. One might write a preamble to the constitution like this:

…in order to form a permanent federal government, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God do ordain and establish this Constitution…

Oh, here’s the entire thing:

We, the people of the Confederate States, each State acting in its sovereign and independent character, in order to form a permanent federal government, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God do ordain and establish this Constitution for the Confederate States of America.